Skip to content

June 15, 2017

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 15, 2017

CELEBRATING CANADA’S 150TH LOCALLY: STARTING WITH ALL THE THINGS MADE IN THE BAY OF QUINTE

A Campaign that adds visibility to products Made in the Bay of Quinte expands to new grocery stores in time for Canada’s ‘Big’ Birthday.

Freshco Belleville franchisee, Daniel Bremner beams with pride at the new grocery store shelf signage highlighting Bay of Quinte goods. “I was surprised myself at how many products there are! Buying these products gives customers an extra level of ‘feel good’: it tells them they’re supporting local jobs when they buy products are made locally.”

Bremnar adds, “It’s already important to our community to buy local fresh produce – now they can see what else they can buy to support their neighbours.”

In an initiative started by the Quinte Economic Development Commission (QEDC) (an organization driven by three Bay of Quinte municipalities) in 2015, now the Made In the Bay of Quinte shelf hangers are in many more Bay of Quinte grocery stores in time for Canada Day celebrations.

“Everyone loves the feeling of a Farmer’s Market – and now you can shop local goods year round with these shelf talkers in your local grocery stores,” says Chris King, QEDC’s CEO. “We don’t always think of something in a package as ‘made locally’ – but in the Bay of Quinte region, jobs in Food Processing and Packaging is a huge part of our economy.”

The Bay of Quinte also is also bringing awareness to products manufactured locally which businesses around the globe rely on; and a local truckload services company has been working with QEDC to outfit 600 trucks with a “Proudly Shipped From The Bay of Quinte” logo.

The QEDC tracks the financial impact of programs like this and reports that “every dollar invested in manufacturing (including food processing) generates over $3.05 in total economic activity which is the highest multiplier of any major sector according to Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters (CME).”

From breakfast cereal and cheeses to muffins and facial tissue,  “We’re lucky that multinational companies headquartered elsewhere have a division in the Bay of Quinte. They don’t just hire locals to make their product, they hire trades to support their plant – and whole businesses start up because these companies are here. That’s a lot of jobs,” Brenmar points out.

There’s a legacy local companies pass on too. With Trenton Cold Storage being in business here for over 100 years and Sprague Foods’ operating in the region for over 90 years, these companies are woven into the fabric of a community. “Besides creating business opportunities and jobs, they’re also paying local taxes which improves the quality of life for residents across the region,” adds King.

As we celebrate Canada’s 150th anniversary, the Made in the Bay of Quinte program- turned movement- shows how important the local economy is to Canadians who may otherwise feel disconnected.

There’s lots more room for more grocery stores to participate – ask your local grocery store if they’ve spoken to the QEDC yet about getting their Made in Quinte signage.

About QEDC: Quinte Economic Development Commission is an incorporated not-for-profit corporation, dedicated to promoting the economic growth in its member municipalities, specifically the City of Belleville, the Municipality of Brighton and the City of Quinte West.

###
Media Contact:
Chris King, Ec. D.,
Chief Executive Officer
Email:
chris@quintedevelopment.com
Tel: (613) 961-7990

For more information, or to schedule an interview with Chris King at QEDC, please contact (613) 961-7990.

Tags: Manufacturing

Similar Posts:

Celebrating Canada’s 150th Locally: Starting With All The Things Made In The Bay Of Quinte

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 15, 2017

Search

English Français Deutsche Italiano